Friday, February 17, 2006

Cleric offers reward to kill cartoonist!

Cleric offers reward for killing cartoonist Vow comes as Pakistan arrests 125, including radical Islamic leader
MSNBC News Services
Updated: 9:04 a.m. ET Feb. 17, 2006
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A Pakistani Muslim cleric said Friday that he and supporters were offering rewards of more than $1 million for killing Danish cartoonists who drew caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.
Maulana Yousef Qureshi, a cleric in the northwestern city of Peshawar, said during Friday prayers that he personally had offered to pay a bounty of 500,000 rupees ($8,400), while a jewelers association was putting up $1 million, and others were offering $17,000 plus a car.
Qureshi repeated the offer at rally later in the city to protest against the cartoons.
"If the West can place a bounty on Osama bin Laden ... we can also announce reward for killing the man who has caused this sacrilege of the holy prophet," Qureshi told Reuters, referring to the $25 million U.S. bounty on the al-Qaida leader's head.


What a BRILLIANT Idea! Why din't I think of this first and put up the $100 that I have. It isn't much but I bet some Luny Bin will rise to the occasion and secure his way to paradise! Seriously though, when will we learn????? Will we ever??? We want the world to stop thinking we are terrorists, so much so that we will terrorize them into not thinking it! Hopefully, a cleric or something will do some damage control.

Yes oh West, we are all for freedom of speech and freedom of every kind, except that not one of us is free, and when we disagree with you, we will go for your throat, so you better not piss us off. SAD.

The loser of a cleric should be fired, but sadly, me thinks he will be revered. Quick someone kill him so he too can go to paradise.

4 comments:

TariqKhonji said...

See this is related to the debate taht we had earlier. A religious leader should be a cleric only in the mosque, ma'atam, church, synagogue, etc. They have no right to interfere in public life because theire beliefs are not necessarily the same as everyone else in society.
Similarly, while Muslims can practice their freedom of speech by condeming the cartoons, they cannot interfere in the public right of people to draw or publish them because not everyone in the world holds the same things in reverence.



In Bahrain we have religious politicians who lead Islamic political parties. They should be considered 'shaikhs' in their mosques or ma'atams and 'Mr' in public life.

The key is a seperation between the two. Religion and public life simply do not mix in a modern society.

Gardens of Sand said...

"A religious leader should be a cleric only in the mosque, ma'atam, church, synagogue, etc. They have no right to interfere in public life because their beliefs are not necessarily the same as everyone else in society."

I agree with you, however, they too are members of the public life and so like others can and should have an opinion. Their word should not be the final say, just an advice that can be taken or discarded.

"In Bahrain we have religious politicians who lead Islamic political parties. They should be considered 'shaikhs' in their mosques or ma'atams and 'Mr' in public life. The key is a seperation between the two. Religion and public life simply do not mix in a modern society. "
If the majority of the people want these religious figures to lead and be heads of political parties, if the majority support the cleric and vote him in a public office, then so be it. The separation between religion and state should be deteremined by the people. I guess in the case of Bahrain, the majority has spoken and will reap what they sowed.

Not the kinda deal I would go for personally, but I recognize that not all would share my opinion/belief. All I could hope for is that when the majority rules in Bahrain, the minority's rights will be protected.

TariqKhonji said...

I'm not proposing banning religious parties from standing for office... but there should be some kind of campaign or something to make the public understand the difference between the two.
In the US when George W. Bush uses religion to justify his actions (like his position on stem cell research) people get mad about it. When this kind of thing happens in Bahrain, noboday says anything. In fact, they often can't say anything without being called an infidel, etc.
So Bahrain doesn't have that protection that Western societies have. This is why I think there needs to be a constitutional seperation of religion and state or at least a removal of any mention of Sharia law as being one of the main sources for legislation because this is being taken advantage of.

Gardens of Sand said...

But aren't the people themselves to blame? Shouldn't they know the difference and use their judgement before following anyone or anything? Sometimes, people have to learn the wrong way to do things before accepting the right way.

As to some distinction between religion and state, Western countries are secular and religious freedom and tolerance is somewhat restricted there. I don't think the conservative Bahrainis (and most Bahraini ppl are) would ever go for that kind of separation because it pushes religion to the sidelines as if it is a recreational activity.

The list of changes that need to happen to Bahrain's political situation is neverending but I don't think these changes will ever materialize.

When it comes to politics, I think the lesson Bahrainis need to learn is to stop namecalling and bashing others with different positions and opinions. We need to learn to respect an individual regardless of his/her beliefs, inclinations, and politics.